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Summary: Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation Part 9 – Art under 17th century French authoritarianism and the German pursuit of happiness 

  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • The logic of state authoritarianism imposed on all aspects, including and above all the arts, a “certain inhumanity.”

    “It was the work not of craftsmen, but of wonderfully gifted civil servants. As long as it reflects this grand comprehensive system, it is done with superb conviction. (…) [However,] French Classicism was eminently not exportable.”

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    Tired of the left and right-wing tribal reporting on Viktor Orbán? Read this essay by a centrist Hungarian student

  • By: Levi Varga
  • In my honest opinion, Hungary is not ready for capitalism and civil society. Every attempt beforehand to establish these was more or less amateurish and resulting in more of a feudal outcome where we copied a Western nation without harmonizing any differences between the two states. Those who voted for Orbán did not vote because of hate and fear, although the campaign to demonize immigrants worked like a charm, they voted for FIDESZ because they wanted to receive a familiar sense of safety that they did not get from Gyurcsány or the previous cabinets since 1989.
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    Summary: Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation Part 8 – The Light of Experience in The Netherlands

  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • Clark explains that he is in Holland because he thinks the Dutch Republic is the first country to profit from a civilisational shift: “the revolution that replaced Divine Authority by experience, experiment and observation.” His characterisation of this revolution as the changing of the question ‘is it God’s will?’ into ‘does it work?’ or even ‘does it pay?’, is at least easy to remember.
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    Solomonica de Winter – Daydreaming Donatello’s David to life

  • By: Solomonica de Winter
  • Donatello chose to portray a boy, the young body of someone not destined for war and who would not survive one. But, and this was the message; through the power of god even a small boy like David could win a battle. What he lacked in physical strength he made up for with his unquestioned religious faith. A strange kind of magical delirium which turns a boy into a godly warrior.
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    Essay – Europe should actively aim to deconvert its Muslim population through welcoming kindness, it’s the only option it has

  • By: Marobane
  • We are faced with a large minority from an Islamic background, a significant amount of whom cherish beliefs and conduct themselves in ways that threaten the foundations of European civilisation. Not simply because they oppose our values, but that the simplest, most radical solution that comes to mind, is even more of a threat to us and our values. We appear stuck between the devil and the deep blue sea. If Europe fights, it loses as a culture, it will die; if we try to swim away, we drown. But perhaps there is a third option.
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    Summary: Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation Part 7 – Grandeur and Obedience in early 16th century Rome

  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • Clark returns to the grandeur of early 16th century Rome. The Reformation and subsequent Wars of Religion, whose devastating effect on Western Europe Clark describes in passing naturally had their impact on Rome. Part 7 is dedicated to the extraordinary resilience and ability shown by Catholicism to bounce back from a seemingly desperate position. And the situation was bad. As Clark describes it, Rome had been humiliated: “The city had been sacked and burnt, the people of Northern Europe were heretics, the Turks were threatening Vienna.”
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    Jordan Peterson responds in written publication to what the alt-right calls the ‘Jewish Question’

  • By: Timon Dias
  • “The players of identity politics on the far right continue ever-so-pathologically to beat the anti-Semitic drum, pointing to the over-representation of Jews in positions of authority, competence and influence (including revolutionary movements). I’m called upon–sometimes publicly, sometimes on social media platforms–to comment on such matters, and criticized when I hesitate to do so (although God only knows why I would hesitate :))”
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    Summary: Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation Part 6 shows little love for the Germans

  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • One might assert that his view of Germany is a 20th-century sentiment speaking through a man who has lived through both World Wars, and is maybe somewhat inappropriate for a discussion of the late 15th century. When Clark talks about “these destructive national characteristics,” he uses 19th-century concepts that barely fit the political or cultural constellation around 1500.
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    Mythology – Was Thor a drag queen? Well, yes, but he had his reasons you know

  • By: Robert Ossenblok
  • And so it came to be, Thor dressed as a bride and pretended to be Freya, who was about to be married off to ThrymskvidaI. At the banquet, Thor, whose near-limitless appetite was only matched by his lack of self-restraint, ate whole oxen and drank by the barrel. When the king inquired about the bride’s appetite, Loki ensured him it was only because the bride was so in love that she had lost her appetite for the previous days. Only now, in the presence of her one true love, was she able to eat again.
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    Summary. Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation Part 5 – The Hero as Artist: Michelangelo, Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci

  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • Clark describes Medieval Rome, maybe too harshly, as a time when the Romans lived in their city, essentially as people without a past. Pressed down by the weight of the giants of Antiquity, which they no longer understood, they treated the city as if it was a natural phenomenon. This is, according to Clark, what changed with the Renaissance, when Antiquity no longer oppressed, but was taken as a challenge. Concentrating on art, as always, Clark describes three “heroes” of the Renaissance: Michelangelo, Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci.
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    Check out TOC’s brand trailer to see what we’re all about!

  • By: Timon Dias
  • It’s been a long time in the making lads, but here it is: the future of European online media. The Old Continent is designed to push back against the Social Justice and Identity Politics agenda of VICE, Huffington Post and BuzzFeed, while at the same time offering a centre right, more fun and light-hearted alternative to Breitbart’s and Infowars’ high octane polemics and conspiracies that don’t get anyone laid.
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