View Post
  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • One might assert that his view of Germany is a 20th-century sentiment speaking through a man who has lived through both World Wars, and is maybe somewhat inappropriate for a discussion of the late 15th century. When Clark talks about “these destructive national characteristics,” he uses 19th-century concepts that barely fit the political or cultural constellation around 1500.
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Robert Ossenblok
  • And so it came to be, Thor dressed as a bride and pretended to be Freya, who was about to be married off to ThrymskvidaI. At the banquet, Thor, whose near-limitless appetite was only matched by his lack of self-restraint, ate whole oxen and drank by the barrel. When the king inquired about the bride’s appetite, Loki ensured him it was only because the bride was so in love that she had lost her appetite for the previous days. Only now, in the presence of her one true love, was she able to eat again.
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • Clark describes Medieval Rome, maybe too harshly, as a time when the Romans lived in their city, essentially as people without a past. Pressed down by the weight of the giants of Antiquity, which they no longer understood, they treated the city as if it was a natural phenomenon. This is, according to Clark, what changed with the Renaissance, when Antiquity no longer oppressed, but was taken as a challenge. Concentrating on art, as always, Clark describes three “heroes” of the Renaissance: Michelangelo, Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci.
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Timon Dias
  • We could, of course, explain ourselves and bore you half to death with bombastic adjectives. But we’d rather just show you. We believe that notions of left vs right, liberal vs conservative are outdated and disorienting. Instead, we’re positioned in the second quadrant (Q2) of Eric Weinstein’s Four Quadrant Model. In short: we detest the political correctness and identity politics of Q1, but we refuse to accept that alarmist boomer polemics and the alt-right in Q3 are the only alternatives.
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Timon Dias
  • After Peterson appeared on Joe Rogan last year, I decided to watch his lecture series Personality and its Transformations, Maps of Meaning and The Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories. Prety profound stuff, with one central theme: how to be in the world as an individual.
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • In the Pazzi Chapel, Clark says, the beginnings of the Renaissance are visible. Though often considered small, Clark claims that this is actually because of a new perspective, so to speak, in culture in which “everything is adjusted to the scale of reasonable human necessity.” This whole change in outlook he catches in one phrase, coined by Protagoras:”Man, the measure of all things.”
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Ralf S. Willems
  • “It does not break wills, but it softens them, bends them and directs them; it rarely forces action, but it constantly opposes your acting; it does not destroy, it prevents birth; it does not tyrannize, it hinders, it represses, it enervates, it extinguishes, it stupifies, and finally it reduces each nation to being nothing more than a flock of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the shepherd.”
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • This leads into a discussion of the ideal of Courtly Love. This, Clark says, is an invention of the Middle Ages – unknown to Antiquity. He offers three possible theories for its invention: Firstly, that Courtly Love as an idea was derived from Persian literature that Crusaders encountered in the Middle East. Secondly, Clark puts forward that it might have been the social position of noble women that inspired a sort of admiration that had to remain distant. Thirdly, he mentions the link between Courtly Love and the veneration of the Virgin Mary.
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Lars Benthin
  • “There is but one truly serious philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy. All the rest – whether or not the world has three dimensions, whether the mind has nine or twelve categories, comes afterwards.”
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Adrien De Boer
  • Influenced by both jazz and European gipsy and folk music, they gave birth to a new genre: Gipsy Jazz. With their music, Django and his gang established that true, romantic and classic “Paris jazz” kind of feel, that upon hearing will make one long for drinking wine in small, smokey French cafés, and a nightly stroll along the Seine.
    View Post
    View Post
  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • In part II of this 1969 thirteen part series, art historian Kenneth Clark (1903 – 1983) discusses what he calls the “great acceleration of development” around 1100, which took place worldwide, but was “strongest and most needed in Western Europe.” He describes the profound changes in Europe at the time as an outpouring of energy in all branches of life, but will, for the most part, be concentrating on art, particularly architecture. He uses the monumental buildings of the age as his evidence for the “heroic energy, this confidence, this strength of will and intellect” with which they were built.
    View Post
    Page 3 of 5
    1 2 3 4 5