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  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • In part one of this thirteen part series, art historian Kenneth Clark (1903 – 1983) discusses a great range of topics. The disappearance of the Mediterranean centred Graeco-Roman Civilisation through exhaustion. The Celtic Church and it’s unique development, focused on the pictoral element, on the edge of the world, culminating in the Book of Kells. The Carolingian Renaissance and its rediscovery of the Mediterranean world and the written word.
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  • By: Timon Dias
  • In the video Ferguson strong arms his emphasis on the divisive element of social media a little too much, to hammer home his analogy to the conflicts following the Reformation, but he does have a point. Keeping it real though, he’s not in favor of censorship policies, and says he’d rather be offended or potentially misled than having Silicon Valley control our news flows.
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  • By: Adrien De Boer
  • In the text below, we’ll summarise the first hour of the lecture “Introduction to the idea of God”, in which Peterson aims to formulate a psychological framework for the emergence and interpretation of the concept of god. Why? Well, because sometimes a fifteen-minute read to absorb and recap beats sitting through a two-hour lecture.
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  • By: Lars Benthin
  • “When the world becomes too large to be controlled, social actors aim to shrink it back to their size and reach. When networks dissolve time and space, people anchor themselves in places, and recall their history. When the patriarchal sustainment of personality breaks down, people affirm the transcendent value of family and community, as God’s will.”
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  • By: Emma Alberta Webb
  • The Director of the Pompidou Centre, where the masterpiece now takes sanctuary like a relic fleeing the reformation, described it as a “funny” work of art that is “an obvious nod to the relationship of abstraction and figurative painting that co-exist in Dutch art in the 20th century. Spiritual yes, obscene no.”
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  • By: Timon Dias
  • First, there’s the EU’s primary internal contradiction: EU federalism is an ideology that propagates post-ideologism; a culturally amorphous post-ideological world. A cosmopolitan easy going agnostic world, in which the single market and currency have made nationalism obsolete. Indeed, a world where the European Parliament invites a long-haired bearded shemale to perform in front of its building and announces him/her as “The voice of Europe” singing for equality, without anyone batting an eye.

    The EU’s core problem, however, is that in its way of viewing and engaging the world beyond Brussels’ city walls, it is acting as if the world has already arrived at this so badly coveted post-cultural and post-ideological end station.

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  • By: Lars Benthin
  • Steiner states that in the 18th and 19th century, philosophical and artistic progress led to such great heights, that we as Western Civilization thought we had reached a maximum. The emphasis of rationality in science secularised philosophy and with the Death of God, as Nietzsche proclaimed, we humans were from now on supposed rule our own lives and create our own values. 

    But with the death of God came something else. With the progress of science, we started to separate natural and traditional phenomena from a transcendent meaning or purpose.

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  • By: Thierry Baudet
  • In his dystopian classic, The Managerial Revolution (1941), the American political scientist James Burnham coined the concept of “controlled democracy”. According to Burnham, the civil democracies of the second half of the 20th century would – more or less gradually – be overgrown with backroom bureaucratic networks that make the actual decisions, all far away from the electorate and public debate. While this would slowly but surely erode the democratic mandate of governments, Burnham explicitly didn’t expect that this would lead to the dissolution of the European nation-state – in name, that is.
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  • By: Willem Cornax
  • With the EU-court ruling against Poland, there is one thing becoming clearer by the day. The EU is in the fast lane on the road to ancient Athens. Not, however, the Athens of the idyllic democracy so widely cherished. Because, as Thucydides wrote, Athens built its democracy on a colonialist empire. 
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  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • “It’s actually a woman, somewhere over the age of 30 and fairly tall too, measuring around 170 centimetres. Aside from the complete warrior equipment buried along with her – a sword, an axe, a spear, armour-piercing arrows, a battle knife, shields, and two horses – she had a board game in her lap, or more of a war-planning game used to try out battle tactics and strategies, which indicates she was a powerful military leader. She’s most likely planned, led and taken part in battles.”
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