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  • By: CodeSupply
  • First, there’s the EU’s primary internal contradiction: EU federalism is an ideology that propagates post-ideologism; a culturally amorphous post-ideological world. A cosmopolitan easy going agnostic world, in which the single market and currency have made nationalism obsolete. Indeed, a world where the European Parliament invites a long-haired bearded shemale to perform in front of its building and announces him/her as “The voice of Europe” singing for equality, without anyone batting an eye.

    The EU’s core problem, however, is that in its way of viewing and engaging the world beyond Brussels’ city walls, it is acting as if the world has already arrived at this so badly coveted post-cultural and post-ideological end station.

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  • By: afc_support
  • Steiner states that in the 18th and 19th century, philosophical and artistic progress led to such great heights, that we as Western Civilization thought we had reached a maximum. The emphasis of rationality in science secularised philosophy and with the Death of God, as Nietzsche proclaimed, we humans were from now on supposed rule our own lives and create our own values. 

    But with the death of God came something else. With the progress of science, we started to separate natural and traditional phenomena from a transcendent meaning or purpose.

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  • By: Thierry Baudet
  • In his dystopian classic, The Managerial Revolution (1941), the American political scientist James Burnham coined the concept of “controlled democracy”. According to Burnham, the civil democracies of the second half of the 20th century would – more or less gradually – be overgrown with backroom bureaucratic networks that make the actual decisions, all far away from the electorate and public debate. While this would slowly but surely erode the democratic mandate of governments, Burnham explicitly didn’t expect that this would lead to the dissolution of the European nation-state – in name, that is.
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  • By: Willem Cornax
  • With the EU-court ruling against Poland, there is one thing becoming clearer by the day. The EU is in the fast lane on the road to ancient Athens. Not, however, the Athens of the idyllic democracy so widely cherished. Because, as Thucydides wrote, Athens built its democracy on a colonialist empire. 
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  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • “It’s actually a woman, somewhere over the age of 30 and fairly tall too, measuring around 170 centimetres. Aside from the complete warrior equipment buried along with her – a sword, an axe, a spear, armour-piercing arrows, a battle knife, shields, and two horses – she had a board game in her lap, or more of a war-planning game used to try out battle tactics and strategies, which indicates she was a powerful military leader. She’s most likely planned, led and taken part in battles.”
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  • By: afc_support
  • Mozart and Beethoven are the most significant representatives of the Viennese School,  so they’re a great place to start exploring the classical repertoire. In future pieces, we’ll have a more detailed analysis of their lives, the meaning of their work and the way it came about. But for now, just lay back and casually acquaint yourself with this marvellous chapter of European heritage.  
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  • By: Robert Ossenblok
  • When the Brexit-vote took place, there were those who claimed that the referendum was invalid because the young had overwhelmingly voted for remain. Apparently the elderly were no longer wise enough, they were ignorant and close-minded. The claim portrays the idea that the youth should have a bigger say in ruling the country, one that is larger than a simple equal representation.
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  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • “The system of fortifications centred around the Trelleborg-type ring fortresses displayed Harald Bluetooth’s ability to command and organise significant manpower and resources, while offering major strategic benefits.”
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  • By: Emma Alberta Webb
  • Somewhat detracting from the quality of my immersive experience, I missed the beginning of “Showpony” during which “a single dancer slowly sits on an audience member’s lap, one after the other- a lap dance, a pony show, and/or a dog show, so to speak”. In another room, the artist “explores the idea of sincerity and seriousness” in a work entitled “Bathing Suit” during which a “lone female performer ritualistically undresses”.
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  • By: afc_support
  • The American trumpeter born in 1926 had a tremendous influence on jazz music in the 20th century. Without Davis, jazz history would have looked completely different. In the 1940s he played with saxophone legend Charlie Parker, in 1958 his album Kind of Blue would change jazz forever, and in the sixties, he recorded the first ever jazz rock albums.
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  • By: Vincent van den Born
  • “A single stone mass, impregnable to the waves and stronger every day,” that is how the Ancient Roman author Pliny the Elder described Roman maritime concrete structures. While modern marine concrete structures cannot even survive a few decades, Roman piers build 2000 years ago still stand, stronger now than when they were first constructed.
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