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Hannah Arendt’s Origins of Totalitarianism; Preparing men who believe everything is possible and nothing true, to be both executioner and victim

  • By: Lars Benthin
  • “The truth is that the masses grew out of the fragments of a highly atomized society whose competitive structure and concomitant loneliness of the individual had been held in check only through membership in a class. The chief characteristic of the mass man is not brutality and backwardness, but his isolation and lack of normal social relationships.”
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    Essay – What’s this thing called ‘Identity Politics’?

  • By: Willem Jan Hilderink
  • There are some characteristics that most if not all forms of identity politics share. These are 1) a peculiar relationship between the self and the collective, 2) a tendency to measure marginalisation, 3) a strong focus on the concept of power and 4) the lack of some utopian vision. Let’s go through these characteristics one by one.
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    Marcus Tullius Cicero – A Roman patriot Stoic rooted in a Universalist Greek philosophy

  • By: Richard Cunningham
  • Cicero, his Roman contemporary Cato the Younger, and his Roman philosophical successors, Seneca and Marcus Aurelius, went some way to developing Latin Stoicism, which stood some distance from its Greek predecessor, tempered as it was with Roman values and martial culture, which in an imperial, militaristic power such as Rome, was quite different to that of the intellectual, comfortable lives of many Athenian Greek philosophers.
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    Alexis de Tocqueville on modern democracy’s gentle suffocation of the human spirit and the importance of local government

  • By: Ralf S. Willems
  • “It does not break wills, but it softens them, bends them and directs them; it rarely forces action, but it constantly opposes your acting; it does not destroy, it prevents birth; it does not tyrannize, it hinders, it represses, it enervates, it extinguishes, it stupifies, and finally it reduces each nation to being nothing more than a flock of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the shepherd.”
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    Albert Camus’ The Myth of Sisyphus – Embracing life’s absurdity in a universe that couldn’t care less

  • By: Lars Benthin
  • “There is but one truly serious philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy. All the rest – whether or not the world has three dimensions, whether the mind has nine or twelve categories, comes afterwards.”
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    Summary – Jordan Peterson’s Biblical lecture I: “Introduction to the idea of God”

  • By: Adrien De Boer
  • In the text below, we’ll summarise the first hour of the lecture “Introduction to the idea of God”, in which Peterson aims to formulate a psychological framework for the emergence and interpretation of the concept of god. Why? Well, because sometimes a fifteen-minute read to absorb and recap beats sitting through a two-hour lecture.
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    Essay – The age of Tertiary Literature and the broken contract between Words and their Transcendent Meaning

  • By: Lars Benthin
  • Steiner states that in the 18th and 19th century, philosophical and artistic progress led to such great heights, that we as Western Civilization thought we had reached a maximum. The emphasis of rationality in science secularised philosophy and with the Death of God, as Nietzsche proclaimed, we humans were from now on supposed rule our own lives and create our own values. 

    But with the death of God came something else. With the progress of science, we started to separate natural and traditional phenomena from a transcendent meaning or purpose.

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